Mutinous Mindstate

Political images of the American Desi Diaspora. From political posters, to album covers, to t-shirts, to graffiti to stencils to concert posters, to conference posters - I will try to tumble images all things politically Desi. Contributions welcome!

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

Hello everyone
i will perform in Washington DC at the Fridge for the Subcontinental Drift / Beyond Bollywood show “Be(coming) Desi in America.” The show is this Saturday, on the 29th of March. (Facebook event)
The festival showcases South Asian talents and expressions in different mediums (film, storytelling, poetry, stand up comedy, visual + interactive art, music, etc..)
I am the only Deaf performer at the festival and I will perform 2 poems in American Sign Language.
Thanks, and hope to see some of you there.

Circa 2014

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

Hello everyone

i will perform in Washington DC at the Fridge for the Subcontinental Drift / Beyond Bollywood show “Be(coming) Desi in America.” The show is this Saturday, on the 29th of March. (Facebook event)

The festival showcases South Asian talents and expressions in different mediums (film, storytelling, poetry, stand up comedy, visual + interactive art, music, etc..)

I am the only Deaf performer at the festival and I will perform 2 poems in American Sign Language.

Thanks, and hope to see some of you there.

Circa 2014

kayapress:

Join Kaya Press and the USC Visions & Voices Arts & Humanities Initiative for a night of incredible artistic collaboration: Legendary South Asian musicians and poets will come together to celebrate and investigate the rich diversity of South Asian spiritual influences. From ghazals set to music and sung throughout the Muslim world to Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize–winning Gitanjali (Prayer Offering of Song), collaborations between poets and musicians have been a staple of South Asian religious life for centuries. In Mughal courts, nightly mehfils brought these performers together and elevated their collaborations to high art.
This tradition will get a 21st-century update in a landmark evening featuring performances by internationally renowned diasporic South Asian artists including Sufi-influenced rock guitarist Salman Ahmad, vocalist and ten-string double-violin master Gingger Shankar, Mumbai-based dubstep DJ Bandish Projekt and hip hop artist and producer Brooklyn Shanti in collaboration with award-winning poets Kazim Ali, Tarfia Faizullah, Bhanu Kapil, Mandeep Sethi and Amarnath Ravva.The evening will be hosted by comedian/writer/performance artist D’Lo.
Mehfil Massive: South Asian Religions Remixed Through Poetry and Music
Wednesday April 23, 2014 | 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Bovard Auditoirum, University of Southern California (3551 Trousdale Parkway Los Angeles, CA 90089)
 Admission is free. Reservations required. RSVP at the links below beginning Thursday, March 27, at 9 a.m. 
USC Students, Staff and Faculty: To RSVP, click here.General Public: To RSVP, click here.
For further information on this event:visionsandvoices@usc.edu

kayapress:

Join Kaya Press and the USC Visions & Voices Arts & Humanities Initiative for a night of incredible artistic collaboration: Legendary South Asian musicians and poets will come together to celebrate and investigate the rich diversity of South Asian spiritual influences. From ghazals set to music and sung throughout the Muslim world to Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize–winning Gitanjali (Prayer Offering of Song), collaborations between poets and musicians have been a staple of South Asian religious life for centuries. In Mughal courts, nightly mehfils brought these performers together and elevated their collaborations to high art.

This tradition will get a 21st-century update in a landmark evening featuring performances by internationally renowned diasporic South Asian artists including Sufi-influenced rock guitarist Salman Ahmad, vocalist and ten-string double-violin master Gingger Shankar, Mumbai-based dubstep DJ Bandish Projekt and hip hop artist and producer Brooklyn Shanti in collaboration with award-winning poets Kazim AliTarfia FaizullahBhanu KapilMandeep Sethi and Amarnath Ravva.The evening will be hosted by comedian/writer/performance artist D’Lo.

Mehfil Massive: South Asian Religions Remixed Through Poetry and Music

Wednesday April 23, 2014 | 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Bovard Auditoirum, University of Southern California (3551 Trousdale Parkway Los Angeles, CA 90089)

 Admission is free. Reservations required. RSVP at the links below beginning Thursday, March 27, at 9 a.m. 

USC Students, Staff and Faculty: To RSVP, click here.
General Public: To RSVP, click here.

For further information on this event:
visionsandvoices@usc.edu

This is an image of an American Apparel advertisement that had previously said “Made in Bangladesh.” It was ‘adjusted’ by the folks at 18millionrising.org. I wrote a piece at The Aerogram how I too am #MadeInBangladesh: http://theaerogram.com/im-made-bangladesh/

“American Apparel is a known American-made clothing company that prides itself on being sweatshop-free and paying “fair” wages (albeit with questionable sexual harassment allegations against CEO Dov Charney). They are selling their clothing. Thus, we can ascertain that the message in the photo implicitly rejects the notion of buying Bangladesh made “objects.” The implication is that Bangladesh is bad, and American is good. Burka-ed Muslim women are bad, and bare-breasted “former” Muslims with newly found American freedoms are good. Right?”

“But you’re fine with that rejection, right Maks? Because in the press release you state that in high school you distanced yourself from your Islamic upbringing. That you don’t identify as Bengali or American, and you don’t fit into conventional narratives, and that’s why you are essential to Los Angeles.”

“The thing is I’m Bengali, American, a Muslim, a non-hijabi woman, and I’m also an Angeleno. I work constantly to break the mainstream conventional narrative I’m constantly placed in. And I don’t think that makes me any less important to the mosaic that is LA. In fact, LA is littered with women like this, like me. My Los Angeles embraces this diversity and my mosaic is beautiful. Whereas the LA in this marketing campaign is tinged with Islamophobia and xenophobia….”

This is an image of an American Apparel advertisement that had previously said “Made in Bangladesh.” It was ‘adjusted’ by the folks at 18millionrising.org. I wrote a piece at The Aerogram how I too am #MadeInBangladesh: http://theaerogram.com/im-made-bangladesh/

“American Apparel is a known American-made clothing company that prides itself on being sweatshop-free and paying “fair” wages (albeit with questionable sexual harassment allegations against CEO Dov Charney). They are selling their clothing. Thus, we can ascertain that the message in the photo implicitly rejects the notion of buying Bangladesh made “objects.” The implication is that Bangladesh is bad, and American is good. Burka-ed Muslim women are bad, and bare-breasted “former” Muslims with newly found American freedoms are good. Right?”

“But you’re fine with that rejection, right Maks? Because in the press release you state that in high school you distanced yourself from your Islamic upbringing. That you don’t identify as Bengali or American, and you don’t fit into conventional narratives, and that’s why you are essential to Los Angeles.”

“The thing is I’m Bengali, American, a Muslim, a non-hijabi woman, and I’m also an Angeleno. I work constantly to break the mainstream conventional narrative I’m constantly placed in. And I don’t think that makes me any less important to the mosaic that is LA. In fact, LA is littered with women like this, like me. My Los Angeles embraces this diversity and my mosaic is beautiful. Whereas the LA in this marketing campaign is tinged with Islamophobia and xenophobia….”

Prez Obama - the face of Pakistani Viagra via The Aerogram circa 2014.

Prez Obama - the face of Pakistani Viagra via The Aerogram circa 2014.

Infographic on demographics of South Asians in Chicago via SAAPRI circa 2012.

Infographic on demographics of South Asians in Chicago via SAAPRI circa 2012.

Pakoras and Politics circa 2012 via South Asian Network.

Pakoras and Politics circa 2012 via South Asian Network.

18mr:


I know you alone can’t stop racial profiling. It’s going to take a lot of change in the hearts and minds of all Americans and from all levels of government before we can add racial profiling to the list of shameful practices our country has left in the past. But here’s the truth: by eliminating the practice on the federal level, you can send a message to state and local officials that racial profiling has no place in law enforcement.

Read the whole open letter.

18mr:

I know you alone can’t stop racial profiling. It’s going to take a lot of change in the hearts and minds of all Americans and from all levels of government before we can add racial profiling to the list of shameful practices our country has left in the past. But here’s the truth: by eliminating the practice on the federal level, you can send a message to state and local officials that racial profiling has no place in law enforcement.

Read the whole open letter.

This is more like an anti-political poster than a political poster…

This is more like an anti-political poster than a political poster…

Image circa 2010 via GAPIMNY.

Image circa 2010 via GAPIMNY.

Logo for South Asian Political Action Committee (SAPAC).
Desi Divas: Political Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances book cover, available here.

Desi Divas: Political Activism in South Asian American Cultural Performances book cover, available here.

via Pardon My Hindi.